Could Eating Insects Solve The World's Food Crisis?

Animals |

Insects are a super-food, with at least 1,900 edible species. While they’re delicacies in many places, others don't consider them part of a balanced diet. As crazy as it sounds, ground-up crickets have almost no taste and actually contain much more protein than the wheat flour that is typically used to make bread.

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World hunger is a devastating epidemic. 1 in 9 people don’t get enough food, including 34 million children. The number of hungry people in the world exceeds the population of the United States, Canada, and the European Union combined. Interestingly enough, these are also the places that, for the most part, don’t eat insects.

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But this isn’t indicative of their popularity everywhere else, with 2 billion people worldwide who include insects in their daily food consumption. But now, due to environmental concerns and the cost of producing meat, bugs might become more universally accepted.

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As opposed to meat production, which is responsible for a dangerous amount of greenhouse gases, the cultivation of edible insects uses little land and just a fraction of the emissions that come from cattle. On top of this, insects require far less water and no antibiotics or growth hormones.

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According to the United Nations’ Food & Agriculture Organization, producing a kilogram of crickets takes less than a fifth of the feed that cattle eat to yield the same amount. With this new trend set to solve a lot of problems, some restaurants and stores are incorporating insects into their food.

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Experts at Meticulous Research, a Pune, India-based group, say that in the next five years the global market for edible insects could triple to over a billion dollars. Check out the chart below for the official statistics...

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